Gertie


Gertrude Lawrence gave two tickets for her successful play, “Lady in the Dark,” and an inscribed silver thimble to Mrs. Wales Latham, National President of the American organisation in aid of Bundles for Britain. They are seen in Gertrude Lawrence’s dressing-room at the Alvin Theatre [New York]. Most of her salary, nearly £1,000 a week, is given to British War Relief Funds. (The Tatler, March 19, 1941)

Gertrude Lawrence gave two tickets for her successful play, “Lady in the Dark,” and an inscribed silver thimble to Mrs. Wales Latham, National President of the American organisation in aid of Bundles for Britain. They are seen in Gertrude Lawrence’s dressing-room at the Alvin Theatre [New York]. Most of her salary, nearly £1,000 a week, is given to British War Relief Funds. (The Tatler, March 19, 1941)

(Source: britishstageandscreen)

tabbyinlove:

Noel Coward and Gertrude Lawrence in Noel`s play - Private lives. 1931.

tabbyinlove:

Noel Coward and Gertrude Lawrence in Noel`s play - Private lives. 1931.

Gertrude Lawrence, Daphne du Maurier and Ellen Doubleday

photos and text from Daphne Du Maurier: The Secret Life of the Renowned Storyteller

Gertrude Lawrence during filming of The Glass Menagerie (1950)

OMG, WHERE CAN I SEE THIS?!

(Source: deborahkerr)


Gertrude Lawrence, c. 1933

Gertrude Lawrence, c. 1933

(Source: deborahkerr)

by Dorothy Wilding, 1939

by Dorothy Wilding, 1939


Cinders, I called her, but why? Cinderella. Surely Gertrude was the last person in the world to make anyone want to call her by that name? Yet I did. Cinders … someone of importance had given a party to which she hadn’t been invited. I mocked her. ‘Poor old Cinders.’ It was her name from then on. She retaliated by calling me Dumb-Du-M.
I went and met Gertrude, not Cinders yet, at the station. She was wearing a fur coat. I remembered that Gerald, my father, always gave his leading ladies presents and took them to lunch at the Savoy. I must do the same. I asked Gertrude to lunch at a small table at the Savoy Grill, where we could talk uninterrupted about the play. She took one look at the table, ‘But nobody will see me here.’ We hastily moved to a table where everyone could see her as they walked into the Grill. She was so right. Then I do recollect presents of champagne, a fur rug either for her flat or her car, I’ve no idea, but I had an account at Fortnum’s, so to some extent I was doing a Gerald.– Daphne du Maurier(Photographed at Waterloo Station, London, October 1948)

Cinders, I called her, but why? Cinderella. Surely Gertrude was the last person in the world to make anyone want to call her by that name? Yet I did. Cinders … someone of importance had given a party to which she hadn’t been invited. I mocked her. ‘Poor old Cinders.’ It was her name from then on. She retaliated by calling me Dumb-Du-M.

I went and met Gertrude, not Cinders yet, at the station. She was wearing a fur coat. I remembered that Gerald, my father, always gave his leading ladies presents and took them to lunch at the Savoy. I must do the same. I asked Gertrude to lunch at a small table at the Savoy Grill, where we could talk uninterrupted about the play. She took one look at the table, ‘But nobody will see me here.’ We hastily moved to a table where everyone could see her as they walked into the Grill. She was so right. Then I do recollect presents of champagne, a fur rug either for her flat or her car, I’ve no idea, but I had an account at Fortnum’s, so to some extent I was doing a Gerald.
– Daphne du Maurier
(Photographed at Waterloo Station, London, October 1948)

(Source: deborahkerr)

1940 (presumably in Skylark)

1940 (presumably in Skylark)

in Skylark, 1940

in Skylark, 1940